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# Thursday, 15 May 2008

I haven't done any research, so maybe it is out there.  But I had a thought the other day as I accepted yet another invite to connect from yet another social networking site from someone I have connected with numerous times. 

Wouldn't it be great if I could have one, unified set of social contacts, my social network, that I could then just share out to various social networking sites?  I mean, sure, folks would have to opt into it, someone would have to think about the privacy issues, but good grief, it seems like we need something like that...

Thursday, 15 May 2008 13:02:49 (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [1]  | 
# Wednesday, 23 April 2008

Just reading the first article in the latest edition of Microsoft's The Architecture Journal.  It's called "We Don't Need No Architects" by Joseph Hofstader.  I thought, oh good, someone voicing a dissident opinion, but the article is rather a rebuttal to that claim.  I figure maybe a response to the response is in order. :)

Mr. Hofstader suggests that architects think in terms of bubbles and devs think in terms of code and, by extension, only see part of the picture.  He describes various "architectural" activities such as analyzing the problem domain, choosing and applying appropriate technologies to solve problems, and the use of patterns.

Is it just me, or is this a sort of dumbing down of the developer role in order to support a, potentially unnecessary, distinction between it and "the architect"?  I mean, a smart developer needs to do all of these things, too.  They're not just code monkeys.

In fact, in introducing such a division in responsibilities, we would actually seemingly perpetuate a long-standing problem in software development--a disjuncture between the problem and solution space because we keep trying to insert these business translators (call them technical business analysts, software architects, whatever you want) into our methodology. 

What's wrong with this?  First, it puts the burden for understanding the business onto one (or a few) persons, but more importantly, it limits that mind share to those individuals.  That is never a good thing, but it is especially bad for software.  In so doing, it also puts a burden on those individuals to correctly interpret and translate (a considerable challenge) and finally to sufficiently communicate a design to developers--enter large specification documents, heavier process, and more overhead.

On the other hand, domain-driven design, for instance, is all about instilling domain knowledge into the solution and coming to a common alignment between the business and the solution creators.  It's axiomatic in business that you need a shared vision to be successful, and this approach to software creation is all about that.  Shared vision, mutual cooperation, and a shared language. 

It eliminates the need for a translator because both learn to speak the same domain language.  It eliminates the knowledge bottlenecks (or at least really reduces them), and it increases shared knowledge.  And DDD is not burdened with the distinction between an architect and a developer.  Agile methodologies in general are geared towards reducing barriers and overhead in the creation of software (and that's why they're generally more successful, and they can scale).

I hope that all the brilliant and more-well-known/respected folks will forgive me; this is not intended as a slight, but I have to ask--are we creating the "architecture" profession unconsciously just to create a more defined career path (i.e., a way for us techies to move up the ranks)?  Are we just going with the flow from an old but broken analogy?  Are we introducing roles that really would be better served through other, non-architecty roles?

To this last point, I see some folks suggesting "infrastructure" and "business" and "software" and "whatehaveyou" architects.  Why are we so keen on the term "architect"?  I'll grant, it does sound really fancy, but it is so, so painfully clear that it is ambiguous and overloaded (and inaccurate, if you ask me) .  Maybe these other roles do need to exist in some organizations, but it seems like we're just bent on calling them "architect" for no apparent good reason other than we've latched onto it as a respectable (and well-paid) moniker. 

In choosing to proliferate the "architect" terminology, we're perpetuating and extending the confusion around it.  We're purporting to solve the problem of it being ill-defined, but in reality we're doing the opposite.  And everyone (IASA, Open Group, Microsoft, to name some just in the latest issue of the Journal) is trying to do it all at once with little coordination. 

It seems borderline insane. 

Or maybe I'm the crazy one?

there is no spoon

Wednesday, 23 April 2008 15:15:42 (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [2]  | 
# Sunday, 20 April 2008

I was just reading the sermon Pope Benedict gave today in the Bronx.  The following struck a cord:

The Gospel teaches us that true freedom, the freedom of the children of God, is found only in the self-surrender which is part of the mystery of love. Only by losing ourselves, the Lord tells us, do we truly find ourselves (cf. Lk 17:33). True freedom blossoms when we turn away from the burden of sin, which clouds our perceptions and weakens our resolve, and find the source of our ultimate happiness in him who is infinite love, infinite freedom, infinite life. "In his will is our peace."

Real freedom, then, is God’s gracious gift, the fruit of conversion to his truth, the truth which makes us free (cf. Jn 8:32). And this freedom in truth brings in its wake a new and liberating way of seeing reality. When we put on "the mind of Christ" (cf. Phil 2:5), new horizons open before us!

I've thought about this seeming paradox on a few occasions--that real, radical freedom is found in truth and living in conformity to that truth. 

Loss of Freedom?
There's a common perception that morals, ethics, and religion in general limit our freedom--that we're sacrificing freedom for some greater good.  But we're not actually sacrificing freedom--we're still free to choose to think and act otherwise, however, we are using our freedom, choosing to live in accord with what we believe to be true.  It's a different way to think about it, one that puts it in the right perspective.  I think it is put in a negative perspective so often because we focus on the things we're not supposed to think or do instead of on what we are freely choosing--positively--to think and do.

The funny thing that I've found is that in choosing to align my beliefs and actions with Catholic doctrine, I feel far more at peace and far freer.  I think it is because if we're constantly struggling with the basic (but important!) questions of life, such as our origins, the existence of God and our relationship to the Divine, as well as our right relations with others, we never get off the ground, so to speak--we're always stuck in an infinite loop, wondering and (maybe) worrying, if we are conscientious. 

But if we settle all that, we're free to move on and explore new horizons.  Not only that, I think we are better equipped to explore those new horizons, because we are aligned with truth, with reality.

Mental & Conceptual Models
This reminds me of the idea in psychology of mental models and conceptual models.  My understanding, based on Donald Norman's The Design of Everyday Things (a.k.a., The Psychology of Everyday Things), is essentially that there is a conceptual model that designers create and use when they design and build things.  This is the actual and correct model.  Then there are mental models that users of the design form and use when perceiving and interacting with the design.

The trick in design is to sufficiently express the conceptual model (through a variety of design mechanisms like affordances, feedback, "knowledge in the world," etc.) so that users will form the correct mental model--one that closely aligns with the design's conceptual model.  The reason this is important is that it empowers the users to use the design effectively and not spend undue time and energy trying to figure it out, dealing with frustrations and inefficiencies that come from having a wrong mental model.  You could say that having the right mental model makes the users more peaceful and more free to explore other things because they don't have the frustrations and aren't wasting unnecessary time on it.

Applied Mental Models for Freedom and Happiness
Now map that to how we think and act as human beings.  Imagine that there is a correct conceptual model that specifies how best we human beings can think, act, and relate to others.  This model can be discovered through a variety of the Designer's mechanisms such as nature (e.g., affordances in biology), reason, experimentation (use & feedback both personal, scientific, and historical/anecdotal), and even revelation (documentation, as it were).  Now if we form the correct mental model, one that most closely aligns with the human conceptual model, it follows that we'll be more at peace (less frustrated), more efficient, more effective, and freer to explore other things.  In short, having the right mental model would give us the most radical freedom and happiness.

Wouldn't we be crazy not to use the human design in accordance with the right mental model, once we figure it out?  I think so.  For instance, once we figure out that our door key is inserted into the key slot in a particular way that gets us through the door in the least amount of time, we'd be silly--bordering on insane--to keep trying to use the key in ways that don't match that mental model.  We'd be wasting time, getting frustrated, and getting stuck outside!

No, once we discover the right mental model, the only sane thing to do is to keep using it unless someone comes along and demonstrates a model that seems to work better.  Doing this--adhering to this mental model--is not "blind faith," as many liken the faith of Christians (and others) to be.  On the contrary, adhering to a mental model that seems right  to you is pure sanity, absolute reason; doing anything else would be idiocy of the first degree.

Sharing Your Mental Model - The Right Thing to Do
It also follows that if you see someone standing outside a door, fumbling with a key, unable to figure out how to use it, that what else could you do but walk over, show, and explain the right mental model--the one that you've found is the most effective and least frustrating?  Would it be kind of you to just say "well, whatever that person believes is fine for them" and just leave them stuck and frustrated?  (I'd suggest not.)

So it is with those who share their faith, their mental model about life, the universe, and everything.  They think they've found the right mental model, the one that is most aligned with the ultimate human conceptual model, the one that if applied will provide the most peace, satisfaction, and happiness.  It is an act of kindness, an act of caring, indeed an act of love, to take the trouble to share such a mental model with others.  Correspondingly, it would be an act of meanness, selfishness, even perhaps of hatred, to not share it and try to help others to understand and use it.

So to those who think having faith is ignorant, blind adherence and loss of freedom, I'd suggest they reconsider.  Using the analogy illumined here, it seems clear that such faith is actually the opposite--it is wide-eyed, reasoned, experiential, and ultimately more radically free and more likely to provide lasting happiness (which is a goal I think any sane human being can agree upon, no?). 

Similarly, perhaps the most popular philosophical adage of our age--"what you believe is okay for you and what I believe is okay for me"--is not in actuality the most humane, reasoned, or livable approach.  On the contrary, it seems far more humane--even positively caring--to try to show each other why we think we have the right mental model.  It's something to consider, anyways.

Sunday, 20 April 2008 18:24:28 (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [0]  | 
# Tuesday, 15 April 2008

A few buddies of mine, Phil Winstanley and Dave Sussman, have asked me to pass along that they're doing an upcoming DeveloperDeveloperDeveloper event in Galway, Ireland on 3 May.  So on the off chance I have some readers in that area, I figured I'd pass it along.

Enjoy!

Tuesday, 15 April 2008 17:13:13 (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [0]  | 

I'm becoming more and more averse to the term architecture and architect in terms of creating software, partially because it is such an overloaded term that seems to cause so much continual opining about its meaning but, more importantly, because I don't think it is like what we do, at least not to the extent that seems to be commonly thought.

We are not building houses (or bridges, or skyscrapers, or cities).  Houses, and other physical constructions, rely on pretty much immutable laws of nature, of physics, chemistry, etc.  These sciences are sciences in the established sense--you can perform experiments repeatedly and get the same results, and others who perform those experiments will get the same results.  Physical building, architecture, and engineering is fundamentally a scientific endeavor because it is essentially serving scientific laws.1

Software Serves Human Social Needs
Software, on the other hand, is fundamentally a human and social endeavor.  Above the basic electrical and magnetic level, i.e., hardware, it is purely human constructs built on layers of human-created abstractions built to serve human social needs--for, ultimately, business or pleasure.  As such, we (as a human industry) are pretty much free to create the abstractions as we see fit. 

Beyond the basic hardware translation layer, we are not bound by elemental laws, only by our imagination.  The problem is, it seems to me, that early software development was very closely tied to the electrical engineering disciplines that gave birth to computing machinery, so the early abstractions were engineering-oriented and assumed an unnecessary scientific and engineering bent.  Subsequent developments, for the most part, have built on this engineering basis, and our educational system has perpetuated it.  Even though relatively few software creators these days need to understand the inner workings of the hardware (and even one layer of abstraction up), such low-level engineering is at the core of many computer science curricula.

As the power of computing machinery has grown, we've expanded the uses of software to take advantage of the new power, but we have remained an essentially engineering-based culture and have accrued other engineering-related words such as architecture and architect.  We have engineers and developers, systems analysts, and architects.  We have projects and project managers, and many try to manage software projects as if they were building projects.  We have builds, and we say we're building or developing or engineering software.

We have, built into our very language, an implicit association with physical building, and we have the association repeatedly reinforced by those who want to draw direct analogies between our trades.  Certainly, there are similarities, but I tend to think much of those similarities have been manufactured--they're not inherent to the nature of software.  We've painted ourselves into a corner by such analogies and borrowing of techniques and language.

Perceived Crisis of Complexity and Terminology
Now we're having this crisis, as some seem to paint it, where we need to elaborate further and push the idea that our systems are like cities and that we need varying levels and kinds of architects to help plan, build, maintain, and expand these software cities.  We have folks struggling to define what an architect is, what architecture is, and creating various stratifications within it to expand on this analogy.  We purportedly need enterprise architects, solutions architects, infrastructure architects, data architects, and more.

There is I think a well-intentioned effort to fix it because we do see this corner we've painted ourselves into, but we're reaching for the paint brush and bucket to solve it--reaching for those same ill-fashioned analogies, techniques, mindset, and culture.  We see all this accrued complexity, and our solution is to make things even more complex, both terminologically and systematically, because we're engineers and scientists, and scientific problems are solved with scientific methods and precision, no?.

It seems the underlying problem is that we're approaching the problem all wrong.  The problems we're solving are fundamentally human problems, particularly social problems.  And by social, I don't mean social networking software that is now en vogue; I mean social in the basic sense of dealing with interactions between humans, be that economic, entertainment, education, social connection, or whatever.  It follows, then, that the best solution will be fundamentally human in nature, not scientific, not engineering.

Realigning with Our Core Problem Domain
Maybe we should avoid likening ourselves to engineering and scientific disciplines, and especially, we should shun terminology that ties us to them and binds our thinking into those molds.  As a man thinks, so is he, as the saying goes.  Surely, we can and should learn what we can from other disciplines, but we need to be more reticent to insinuate them into our own as we have done with building.

I do think various solutions have been tried to better align software with its problem domain.  Object-oriented design is at a generic level an attempt to urge this sort of alignment, as is its more developed kin, domain-driven design.  Agile and its like work toward human-oriented processes for creating software.  Natural language systems, workflow systems, small-scale (solution-level) rule engines, and even some higher-level languages have attempted this.  And in fact, as a rule, I think they succeed better than those more closely tied to the computing and building conceptual models, except that even these more human-oriented abstractions are chained by the lower level abstractions we've created.

What we need to do is continue to develop those human-oriented models of creating software.  It seems that we may be at a breaking point, however, for our continued use of the building paradigm.  Our repeated struggles with the terminology certainly seem to speak to that.  Our terribly confused and complicated enterprise systems landscape seems to speak to that.  Our control-driven, formal, gated processes have been most well shown to be broken and inappropriate to the task of software creation.

New Terminology
To make the next step, perhaps we should reexamine at a fundamental level how we think about software, both the artifacts and how we create them.  I think we need to make a clean break with the engineering and building analogy.  Start fresh.  Unshackle our minds.  Maybe we need to drill down the abstraction layers and figure out where we can most effectively make the transition from hardware control to our human, social domain.  I imagine it would be lower than we have it now.  Or maybe it is just a matter of creating a better language, an intentional language (or languages) and a move away from our control-oriented languages. 

At a higher level, we certainly need to rethink how we think about what we do.  Some folks talk about the "architect" being the "bridge" (or translator) between the business and the technical folks.  If that is a technical role, which I tend to doubt, it seems like a more appropriate title would be Technical Bridge or Technical Translator or Technical Business Facilitator or even just Software Facilitator.  Call it what it is--don't draw unnecessarily from another dubiously-related profession.

But maybe thinking this role is best served with a technical person is not ideal.  Maybe we technical folks are again trying to solve the problem with the wrong tools--us.   Well-intentioned though many are, if we are technical in tendency, skills, talent, and experience, we are not as well equipped to understand the squishy, human needs that software serves or best identify how to solve such squishy human problems.

Since software is essentially a human-oriented endeavor, perhaps we need a role more like that which has been emerging on the UX side of things, such as [user] experience designer or interaction designer.  They are better-equipped to really grok the essentially human needs being addressed by the software, and they can provide precise enough specification and translation to technical folks to create the experiences they're designing, even with the tools we have today.

Then again, some say that architects are the ones concerned with high-level, "important" views of a solution, interactions among individual pieces, that they are those who model these high-level concerns and even provide concrete tools and frameworks to help effectively piece them together.  I say that we could call this role solution coordinator, solution designer, or solution modeler.  But then, according to folks like Eric Evans, these folks should be hands-on to be effective,2 which I also believe to be true.  In that case, what they become, really, is a kind of manager or, simply, team leader, someone who's been there and done that and can help guide others in the best way to do it.  At this point, the skills needed are essentially technical and usually just a matured version of those actually crafting the solution. 

Instead of software developers and architects, how about we just have technical craftsmen?  The term is appropriate--we are shaping (crafting) technology for human use; it also scales well--you can add the usual qualifiers like "lead," "manager," "senior," whatever fits your needs.  There's no unnecessary distinction between activities--whether the craftsman is working on a higher-level design or a lower-level, it is all essentially the activity of shaping technology for human use.  Depending on the scale of the team/endeavor, one craftsman may handle all levels of the craft or only part, and in the latter case, the division can easily be made based on experience and leadership.  And finally, it does not introduce cognitive dissonance through extremely-overextended and inaccurate analogy (like developer and architect).

Even if you don't like the term craftsman--we could collaborate to choose another that doesn't chain us to wrong thinking--the point remains that we should recognize that we've introduced unnecessary and unhelpful distinction in our discipline by using the dev and architect terminology.  We could begin to solve the conundrum by abandoning these titles.

Resisting the Urge to Rationalize and Control
Also, by looking at each solution as a craft--an individual solution tailored to address a particular human problem, it becomes clearer that we need not be so ready to try to rationalize all of these solutions into some greater system.  As soon as we do that, we fall back into the engineering and computing mode of thinking that will begin to impose unnatural constraints on the solutions and inhibit their ability to precisely and accurately solve the particular human need.3 

As I suggested before, we should rather treat these solutions more like a biological ecosystem--letting selection and genetic mutation mechanisms prevail in a purely pragmatic way that such systems have so well embedded in their nature.  I believe it is a misplaced good intention to try to govern these systems in a rationalistic, control-driven way.  We deceive ourselves into thinking that we are managing complexity and increasing efficiency when in reality we are increasing complexity that then, recursively, also has to be managed in such a philosophy (creating an infinite complexity management loop).  We also reduce efficiency and effectiveness (well-fittedness) of solutions by interfering with solutions with controls and imposing artificial, external constraints on them to serve our governance schemes.4

Wrapping It All Up
Once we stop trying to align ourselves with a fundamentally different endeavor--physical building--we free ourselves to essentially orient what we're doing towards the right domain--human social problems.  In doing so, we can re-examine our abstraction layers to ensure they most effectively fit that domain at the lowest possible level, and then we can start building new layers as needed to further enable effective (well-fitted) solutions for that domain.  By changing our language, we solve cognitive dissonance and illuminate where distinctions are truly needed, or not needed, and may even recognize where skills that are not inherently technical would better serve our solutions (such as UX pros).  And lastly, by treating the solutions as fundamentally human, we recognize that the most efficient, effective, time-tested5 and proven technique for managing them is more biological and less rational.  We see that they can best manage themselves, adapting as needed, to fit their environment in the most appropriate way possible.

If we're going to have a go at fixing the perceived current problem of complexity in software and, by extension, further understand how to solve it through our profession, I suggest that a somewhat radical departure from our current mode of thinking is needed, that we need to break away from the physical building analogy, and it seems to me that something like what I propose above has the most long-term promise for such a solution.  What do you think?

Notes
1. I should note that I recognize the artistic and ultimately social aspects physical constructions; however, they are still fundamentally physical in nature--bridges are physically needed to facilitate crossing of water or expanse, buildings are needed physically for shelter.  The social aspects are adornments not inherent to the basic problems that these constructions solve.  The same cannot be said of software; it exists solely to serve human social advancement in one form or another.
2. See Eric Evan's "Hands-On Modeler" in Domain-Driven Design: Tackling Complexity in the Heart of Software.
2. As an aside, I truly do wonder why we should have to try to convince businesses of the need for the "architect" role.  If you ask me, the need, and our value/solution, should be obvious.  If it takes a lot of talking and hand waving, maybe we should question if the solution we're proposing is actually the right one.  ?
3. I have to nuance this.  Obviously, if there are governmental regulations you have to follow, some such controls are required; however, if you think about it, this is still adapting the solution to best fit the human problem because the human problem likely involves some need of societal protection.  Certainly not all systems need such controls, and even only some within an organization need them.  Keep the controls scoped to the solutions that require them due to the human social conditions.  On the whole, I'd say that there are vastly far more systems that don't need them, though the ones that do loom large in our minds.
4. By this I mean to say that, according to evolutionary theory, biological processes have developed over many millions of years and have proven themselves as an effective means for highly emergent, living systems to self-govern.  Businesses and human social structures in general, especially these days, are highly emergent, dynamic, and living and need software that reflects that mode of being.

Tuesday, 15 April 2008 04:04:01 (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [1]  | 
# Saturday, 12 April 2008

In his article, "Who Needs an Architect?", Martin Fowler says:

At a fascinating talk at the XP 2002 conference1, Enrico Zaninotto, an economist, analyzed the underlying thinking behind agile ideas in manufacturing and software development. One aspect I found particularly interesting was his comment that irreversibility was one of the prime drivers of complexity. He saw agile methods, in manufacturing and software development, as a shift that seeks to contain complexity by reducing irreversibility—as opposed to tackling other complexity drivers. I think that one of an architect’s most important tasks is to remove architecture by finding ways to eliminate irreversibility in software designs.

How interestingly this melds with my recent thoughts on managing complexity.2 You see, adding processes, management systems, and "governance" in general makes things more ossified, more difficult to change, i.e., less reversible.  According to Zaninotto, this would mean that the more governance we put in place to, theoretically, manage the complexity of our software systems, the more complex they are bound to become, which I think logically means that we are increasing our complexity woes rather than helping them through such efforts.

I came across this in a recent thread on our (now-retired-)architect MVP email list, where the age-old discussion of "what is an architect?" has come up again.  I have to admit, when I first seriously confronted this question, I was drawn in and fascinated.  I even wrote an article about it on ASPAlliance.3  Since writing that, I've been keeping an eye on the developments at IASA and elsewhere in this space, and developing my own thoughts.

I've delved even more into agile approaches, particularly Scrum and domain-driven design (DDD), and into this thing we call "user experience,"4 which at first glance seems counter to our architectural/engineering approaches to building software.  I've gained more experience building software as an architect and manager and observing software being built at the commercial level.  I've been more involved in the business and marketing side of things, and I've been blessed with the opportunity to learn from some of the leading minds in our profession. 

At this point, I'm of the get 'er done school, which I suppose might map loosely to Fowler's Architectus Oryzus, Eric Evans' Hands On Modeler, and others along those lines.  I'm bought into User-Centered Design (or human-centered design, for those who prefer that), though I think we need to figure out a good way to merge DDD with UCD and a smattering of service orientation (as needed!) to make software the best it can be.

Software is complex enough without our making it more so with artificial taxonomic and gubernatorial schemes.  Software should be teleological by nature.  It exists to serve an end, a purpose, and if it isn't serving that purpose, the answer is not to create counterproductive metastructures around it but rather to make the software itself better.

One of the chief complaints about IT is that we seem resistant to change or at least that we can't change at the speed of business.  Putting more processes, formalization, standardization, etc. in place exacerbates that problem.  The other biggie is that software doesn't meet the need it was designed to meet.  Both of these, at their core, have the same problem--ineffective and inefficient processes that are put in place to manage or govern the project.

I tend to think that projects need managing less than people need managing or, rather, coaching.  You get the right people, you give them the equipment, the training, and the opportunity to do the right thing, and you get out the way and help them do it.  You don't manage to dates (or specs!); you manage to results.  If you don't have a solution that meets or exceeds the need at the end of the day, you failed.  In fact, I might go as far to say that if what you built matches the original specs, you did something wrong.

Any managerial involvement should have a concrete and direct end in mind.  For instance, coordination with marketing and other groups requires some management, but such management should be communication-oriented, not control-oriented.  Start small and evolve your management over time.  Management, like other things that are designed, is best evolved over time5 to meet these concrete, real needs--and you should keep an eye out for vestigial management that can be extracted. 

Similarly, I don't think we need to tackle the software (IT) profession by trying to define and stratify everything we do.  In fact, I feel it would be a rather monumental waste of our collective valuable time.  One thing is certain, our profession will change.  New technologies and new ideas will combine with the rapidly changing business needs, and new roles will emerge while old roles will become irrelevant (or at least subsumed into new roles).  Monolithic efforts at cataloguing and defining (and by extension attempting to control) will, in the best of all possible worlds, be useful only for a short time.

It's clear that there are many approaches to doing software.  It's axiomatic that there are many distinct, even unique business needs (inasmuch as there are many unique individuals in the businesses).  What we should be doing, as a profession, (indeed what I imagine and hope most of us are doing) is focusing on how to make great, successful software, not wiling away our lives and energy talking about ourselves. 

If you ask me what I do (e.g., on a demographic form), I tend to put software maker, or just software.  Obviously, that's not specific enough for hiring purposes.  But really, in hiring, we're really looking for knowledge, experience, skills, talents, and attributes, not a role or title.  A title is just a hook, a handy way to get someone interested.  If the market shows that using "architect" in a title catches the attention you want, use it (whether you're a worker or looking for workers).  The job description and interview process will filter at a finer level to see if there's a match.

Outside of that, we don't really need to spend a lot time discussing it.  We're all just making software.  We all have unique knowledge, experience, talents, skills, and attributes, so there really is very little use in trying to categorize it much beyond the basic level.  So how about we stop agonizing over defining and stratifying "architecture" and "architect," stop worrying about controlling and governing and taxonomifying, and instead invest all that valuable time in just doing what we do--better!?

Notes
1.  More at http://martinfowler.com/articles/xp2002.html.
2. See One System to Rule Them All - Managing Complexity with Complexity and Software as a Biological Ecosystem.
3.  Read "What is Your Quest?" - Determining the Difference Between Being an Architect and Being a Developer.
4.  Good place to start: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User_experience
5.  This principle is discussed, for example, in Donald Norman's Design of Everyday ThingsChristopher Alexander also discusses a similar principle in The Timeless Way of Building.

Saturday, 12 April 2008 16:06:39 (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [0]  | 
# Friday, 28 March 2008

I finally gave in and bought a graphics tablet.  My budget being as huge as it was, I opted for the Wacom Bamboo, which retails at $79, but ANTOnline (via Amazon) had it for $50 plus shipping ($58 total).  I haven't been this tickled to get a new gadget in a while.

The whole experience thus far has been grand.  I placed the order at about 10p on Tuesday night.  I got an email Wednesday night saying it had shipped, and when I opened it Thursday morning and clicked the tracking number, I was informed it was out for delivery--and I paid for standard shipping.  Awesome.

I got the box later Thursday morning, and opened it to find a sleek box wrapped in tissue paper, as if it were a gift.  After sliding it out of the tissue paper, here's what I saw:
Wacom Bamboo Box

Not bad styling.  Let's open 'er up:
Wacom Bamboo Welcome Messages

"This is your Bamboo.  Use it to get more out of your computer.  Let us know how it goes..."  In many languages.  Then it is signed by, presumably, the creators.  Very nice touch, I thought.  I felt like a proud owner already.  Then you lift up that insert, and there's the tablet in all its beauty.  Grab it out--there's the cord, the pen, the pen holder.  Great.  Simple. Obvious.  Beneath that is another tissue wrapped gift, a stylish little black box that has some simple instructions on getting going and the DVD.

Wacom Bamboo Open Box

Just opening the thing was a pleasure.  Honestly, these folks know what UX is, and this is just for an $80 graphics tablet. 

I plugged it in, and it immediately just worked.  Having read a comment somewhere, I just went to the Web site to download the latest drivers.  That was easy.  Install.  I had to try twice; it got hung up for some reason, but then, I did have 30 apps open at the time and they did suggest closing them all. :)

I immediately opened OneNote and went to town.  I started drawing the simple stuff as Dan Roam suggests in his new book, The Back of the Napkin.  (I attended his session at Mix and liked it enough to buy the book.)  Then I really went out on a limb and drew a self-portrait:

Ambrose Self Portrait

Not bad, eh? 

Well, it was a first shot.  I tried writing and realized just how bad my penmanship has become over the years.  Trust me; it's bad.  Nice thing is that maybe I'll get some of it back and improve it now that I have this (who knows?). 

I'm now on Day 2 of using my Bamboo, and I really like it.  My wrist, which had been hurting more as of late, has been loving me.  One of the reasons I tried this was to see if it'd be better to avoid "repetitive strain injury," and I noticed an immediate difference.  The other reason was because I get so tired of being constrained by drawing programs in terms of what I want to represent visually.  SmartArt in Office really, truly (as cool as it is) only goes so far. :)

So my first real use was to start diving into my Agile UX Design Process diagram to replace a particularly painful slide (Slide 19) in my Building Good UX talk.  It (both the drawing and the process) is a work in progress; just trying to visualize some of my thinking about it right now.

Agile UX Design Process

If you look hard, you can see my chicken scratch compared to the nice, free Journal font I picked up.  The point of this diagram is to show how to integrate UX pros into an Agile process.  Not saying this is all fleshed out or perfect, but it's a start. :)  One important point is that even if you don't have the pros, you can start doing the UX stuff yourself.

A Few Tips Using Bamboo (thus far)

  1. Use Mouse mode.  When you install the driver, it switches to Pen mode, which tries to map your screen(s) to the tablet.  Even though Wacom recommends this mode (even provides exercises to get use to it), I found it frustrating when trying to draw on my right screen--I felt too close to the edge for comfort. 
  2. Disable acceleration.  While it can be a nice feature when using it literally like a mouse, it messes you up when drawing.
  3. Switch to the dreaded single-click mode in Explorer.  Back when the single click mode was added (XP?), I tried it out and was disgusted.  But double-clicking w/ the pen is just not easy, and actually, the single-click mode feels really natural with the pen.
  4. Switch to scroll on touch ring. I don't feel too strongly about this, but honestly, I don't use zoom (the default) enough to have it as a top-level feature on the tablet.
  5. Upgrade to Vista?  I think that you must not get ink in Office 2007 w/o Vista?  I can't figure it out, but it's not there for me in XP.  The Wacom site mentions Vista explicitly, and my searches haven't turned up anything useful.  Folks talk about "Start Inking" as if it is just always there, but it may also have something to do with Tablet PC.  I'll let you know if I figure it out.

It is taking some getting used to, of course, but so far I think it's a big improvement.  Ask me in a few weeks. :)

And now for the gratuitous signature:

J. [Ambrose] Little

 

 

 

 

Nice.

Friday, 28 March 2008 17:32:00 (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [2]  | 
# Wednesday, 19 March 2008

Just wanted to let you all know that I'll be speaking at and attending the upcoming ITARC in NYC, May 22-23. The conference is grass roots and platform agnostic. Grady Booch is giving the keynote from 2nd life. There are some great roundtables and panel discussions on SOA, SOAP vs. REST, as well as others.

It should be a good opportunity to get involved with the local architecture community and participate in discussions on what is currently happening. The registration price is lower then other conferences because we are non-profit and just trying to cover the costs.

There is an attendance limit and the early bird registration ends this month so we encourage you to sign up as soon as possible.  Register Now!

Wednesday, 19 March 2008 10:10:19 (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [0]  | 
# Monday, 17 March 2008

For those of you that don't keep an eye on my work blog, my team at Infragistics just published a new Silverlight 2 sample application, faceOut, using prototypes of Infragistics' Silverlight controls.  If you're interested in Silverlight 2 and/or interested in what Infragistics is doing with Silverlight, you should check it out.

Monday, 17 March 2008 08:54:27 (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [0]  | 

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